Monday, August 26, 2013

Construction Site

From the tall stately firs of the Pacific Northwest to the scruffier pines and fruit trees of this semi-rural region in Tunisia, I have always loved trees. Yes, I'm a tree-hugger. 









They pop up in journals and sketchbooks; drawn in pen, pencil, and watercolors or painted in oils or acrylics.




They occupy a place in my "Garden" theme when I work with fabric. There are whole trees,








branches with fruit,






















and leaves.
Yet, none of this approaches nature's act of creation and it now appears superficial to me. What has changed? A long-term project, my Pomegranate Tree Quilt, has taken over my life.

It grew from the seed of an idea two years ago that paralleled the growth of young trees in my garden. It developed branch by branch as my trees poked out their leaves. 





The fruit ripened with layers of stitching. And I ate the real fruit from my trees, admiring their beautiful colors.











The roots spread. 

My tree gained in height and breadth along with the trees in my garden. 

So I feel like I have built this tree bit by bit. It seems to be a more organic process, one that stems from my guts and reaches outwards, a visceral creation attached to deep-seated feelings. Rather than "create", I have constructed this tree from the ground up, from the inside out. Or this tree has dictated how it would be constructed. Each step has demanded serious time and consideration. The end is not yet in sight--pins still hold parts of it together, white spots need to be appliquéd.

[More process photos over at MulticoloredSnippets]
_______________________________________________________________

In the meantime, others attempt to construct the Tunisian nation, however the end is not yet in sight. It is a slow and tedious process. Demonstrations take place every night in front of the Constituent Assembly at the Bardo Palace in Tunis. The opposition calls for the current government (that no longer has a mandate) to step down and allow for a temporary government of neutral technocrats to run the country until elections are held. The ruling religious party tries to buy time while they figure out how they can swing possible elections and at the same time grab all major government and administrative posts. Given the overthrow of the religious party in Egypt, it appears that Tunisia's religious party may be counting its days in power. Tunisia is now a construction site...

Linked to Nina Marie's "Off the Wall Friday."

29 comments:

Karen L. Bates said...

What a lovely tree...well, they are all lovely but this one is special. Wonderful meaning, too. Hope the unrest settles down soon. Good luck.

Ms. said...

It's SO inspiring to see your work. As for the construction site, like the one currently just below me here, it is surely disruptive, and disheartening. May your good heart prevail.

Connie Rose said...

Interesting name, Bardo Palace. Here's what wikipedia says about the Tibetan translation of "bardo"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bardo

Hope you stay well throughout all the political upheaval. Keep doing your fantastic work.

Hugs.

Silvana Vituriano said...

It is pure poetry!

Carole Reid said...

You've created the tree of Tunsian life and construction while teaching me of your homeland. I truly admire you skills. May peace come to you and country. xo Carole

Amanda said...

I'd never heard of Tunisia before stumbling across your blog. It's been interesting to hear from someone in the country, rather than just following the American news (which I doubt to be entirely true, anyway).
I also love all the posts about your creative endeavors. Though I do not quilt, I am in awe of the creativity and the skill of your work. My sewing skills are rather more humble. Thank you for the inspiration.

Martha said...

Thank you for sharing this piece and your journey(s). All are awe-inspiring. I especially love your roots and have tried to make some roots of my own. I hope that's OK.

I have missed seeing your blog entries and worried a bit. I wish you continued peace and safety.

Magpie's Mumblings said...

Your tree is magnificent. I'm sure working on it takes your mind away for just a little while from the upheaval that surrounds you. Stay safe and creative.

Julie Fukuda said...

Your post gives much to contemplate from one tree huger to another. Keep well and keep those trees growing.

MARIA CRISTINA said...

Hermoso el desarrollo de su granado, un árbol muy querido por mí.
Deseo que siga disfrutando en paz de todos los árboles de su jardín.

Quilteuse Forever said...

Les premiers arbres sont très décoratifs,je m'en contenterais bien! Mais voilà, ta force créatrice te fait "accoucher" de ce merveilleux grenadier... Bravo l'Artiste !

Perlhuhn said...

I follow all news about Tunisia and I hope things won´t develop badly.
Your tree is magnificent - especially the roots.
Wishing you the best.
Doris

Mo Crow said...

what a journey!

lei said...

This piece will be/is a tour de force! Breathtaking. Wish I could see it in real life.

Tonya Ricucci said...

love the pomegranate tree - your technique is great. hope things straighten out in the country soon!

Cathie said...

such a magical , metaphorical journey this tree of life, color, change and growth. lovely, lovely post AND quilt.

i like your way of thinking.

jude said...

the pomegranate tree has great presence

The Idaho Beauty said...

The pear quilt is amazing, rich and complex yet intimately knowable. But the pomegranate...It is such an amazing tour de force that can only happen in the way yours has evolved. It exudes life even in its unfinished state.

Karol Kusmaul said...

Wonderful work, Nadia. Thank you for sharing your process.

Norma Schlager said...

I can see why you love trees, you do them so well. This one is a winner for sure. Love those roots!

Mary Stori said...

Your work continues to blow me away......stay safe!!!

Linda M said...

I'm always in awe of your work, the tree just keeps getting better. Whenever I hear news reports from your part of the world I think of you, keep safe.

Regina B Dunn said...

Your tree's textures are wonderful. I love the colors and the white spaces. Your writing about the construction and comparisons to the government are touching. Stay safe and I'm hopeful about your future. My husband lived in Tunisia in 1979-1980 and loved it.

LA Paylor said...

Nadia, I love a tree, and all forms of making them. Your sketches are all so good... I was just in the Adirondacks and tried to sketch the birch... still looks like a four year old did it.
LeeAnna Paylor

Sandy said...

Gorgeous art work! Stay safe and I hope they are able to settle their differences in a peaceful way.

O'Quilts said...

Wonderful on the trees...I love it all. I lost you when Google Reader died...so nice to find you again,amongst the trees...

Rachaeldaisy said...

Wow! Your tree is so beautiful. I love that you are helping this tree grow from the ground up and inside out. you really show it's spirit or essence. somehow you've also captured the sunlight, the wind that blows amongst the leaves, the hum of the surrounding landscape. It's beautiful!!

Gaia said...

What a beautiful piece of fabric art! The colours and the composition so nice and I specially love the roots.. they tell a story of its own.
-Gaia

Radka said...

Lovely post, Nadia!
My tiny new garden has no trees - yet. I can't live without trees,there will be some planting going on this winter :-))
I love your your designs.
x